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Saul, Føllesdal, & Ulfstein: The International Human Rights Judiciary and National Parliaments: Europe and Beyond
Saul, Føllesdal, & Ulfstein: The International Human Rights Judiciary and National Parliaments: Europe and Beyond

Saul, Føllesdal, & Ulfstein: The International Human Rights Judiciary and National Parliaments: Europe and Beyond

Saul, Føllesdal, & Ulfstein: The International Human Rights Judiciary and National Parliaments: Europe and Beyond

Matthew Saul (Universitetet i Oslo – PluriCourts), Andreas Føllesdal (Universitetet i Oslo – Law), & Geir Ulfstein (Universitetet i Oslo – Law) have published The International Human Rights Judiciary and National Parliaments: Europe and Beyond (Cambridge Univ. Press 2017). Contents include:
  • Matthew Saul, Andreas Føllesdal & Geir Ulfstein, Introduction
  • Geir Ulfstein, A transnational separation of powers?
  • Kirsten Roberts Lyer & Philippa Webb, Effective parliamentary oversight of human rights
  • Jürg Steiner, Citizens’ deliberation and human rights
  • Alice Donald, Parliaments as compliance partners in the European convention on human rights system
  • Theresa Squatrito, Parliamentary interpretation and application of European human rights law
  • Matthew Saul, How and when can the international human rights judiciary promote the human rights role of national parliaments?
  • Amrei Müller, Obligations to ‘secure’ the rights of the Convention in an ‘effective political democracy’: how should parliaments and domestic courts interact?
  • Colin Murray, Shifting emergencies from the political to the legal sphere: placing the United Kingdom’s derogations from the ECHR in historical context
  • Nino Tsereteli, The role of the European Court of Human Rights in facilitating legislative change in cases of long-term delays in implementation
  • Leiv Marsteintredet, The Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the mobilisation of parliaments
  • Ed Bates, Democratic override (or rejection) and the authority of the Strasbourg court – the UK parliament and prisoner voting
  • Colm O’Cinneide, Saying ‘no’ to Strasbourg – when are national parliaments justified in refusing to give effect to judgments of international human rights courts?
  • Andreas Føllesdal, Law making by law breaking? A theory of parliamentary civil disobedience against international human rights courts
  • Matthew Saul, Conclusion: how does, could, and should the international human rights judiciary interact with national parliaments?

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